Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Mace & Crown | December 16, 2017

Scroll to top

Top

No Comments

Green Dot Launching Strategy to Reduce Campus Violence

Green Dot Launching Strategy to Reduce Campus Violence
Jonah Grinkewitz
News Editor

Green Dot ODUThis semester, ODU will launch Green Dot, a nationally acclaimed violence prevention strategy for colleges. Originally developed at the University of Kentucky, Green Dot works to establish two cultural norms on campuses. First, power-based violence will not be tolerated. Second,  everyone has a role in maintaining a safe campus.

SGA President Christopher Ndiritu first introduced the initiative to associate Dean of Students Don Stansberry, who employed Wendi White of the ODU Women’s Center to implement the program on campus.

“I knew it would work,” White said. “It’s not just putting up posters, it’s about building relationships across the community and finding out who the opinion leaders are and shifting the cultural and social norms.”

This past October, ODU staff members participated in four days of Green Dot training.

“They made us aware of issues that campuses face, and strategies of how to be a more effective bystander, and what barriers bystanders face,” Stacey Parks, an academic advisor, said about the training. Parks also heads the Green Dot rollout on campus.

“A Green Dot is a behavior, choice, word or attitude that promotes safety for everyone and communicates utter intolerance for bullying, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking or child abuse,” Parks said.

Now that the faculty instructors have been trained, the next step is to train students. There will be two, six-hour bystander training sessions this semester comprised of student leaders on campus who can impact the campus community.

“The research shows that after four years of implementing this strategy, according to the CDC, there can be up to a 50 percent reduction in violence on campuses, and that is our goal,” White said.

The Green Dot strategy has three objectives for bystanders. The first is direct intervention, such as speaking directly to a person you feel is in danger and trying to get them out of the situation. The second is distraction, such as committing a party foul or interrupting the momentum of an action before it happens. The third is delegation–when you don’t feel comfortable taking action and find someone else to step in. This can be asking a friend, the host of the party or calling the police.

“I want to see less people get hurt, and finish their schooling and achieve their dreams, because we have some big problems to solve in this world right now, and we need all the human potential we can muster to address those problems,” White said. “We don’t need people getting sidelined by sexual and personal violence.”

“A Green Dot is a behavior, choice, word or attitude that promotes safety for everyone and communicates utter intolerance for bullying, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking or child abuse,” Parks said.

“The focus is shifting the culture on this campus,” White added. “But after college, students go out into the world. So by starting here we will end up creating a shift eventually everywhere.”

The official unveiling of Green Dot ODU will be on March 29 at the “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event sponsored by the Women’s Center.

Students can search Green Dot ODU on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more information on bystander intervention and Green Dot events at ODU.