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Mace & Crown | April 29, 2017

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Black Student Alliance Hosts Event Showcasing Music and Food

Black Student Alliance Hosts Event Showcasing Music and Food
Kamaria Mason
Contributing Writer
black student alliance

Entertainment at ODU’s “Black Music and Food in Today’s Culture” Event. Photo by Kamaria Mason.

The inviting aroma of buttered, spiced and sugar glazed southern-style foods filled the North Café of Webb Center Wednesday evening, Feb. 24. Old Dominion University students gathered to celebrate the culture behind the hip-hop era.

Although festivities were brought to a momentary standstill as tornado warnings threatened from the outside, the enthusiasm from students did not dwindle. Labeled as “Black Music and Food in Today’s Culture,” the event was hosted by ODU’s Black Student Alliance. This group promotes unity of African-American students on campus and welcomes all interested students.

BSA members Armani Gladden and Carlyssa Winstead emceed the event as they took the audience through a mini journey of the evolution of hip-hop. The first semblance of hip-hop culture is believed to have started in the Bronx, New York around the 1970s.

Since that time, we have been introduced to many groups such as the Sugarhill Gang who are known to have performed the first rap. Other groups also became prominent such as Run-D.M.C. , whose member Darryl “D.M.C.” McDaniels ODU was honored to host back in September 2013.

The event kicked off with three MCs discussing how hip-hop culture has affected many aspects of our daily lives over the last 40 plus years– from fashion and speech to the very opinions we take on certain political matters. Audience members were informed about how early hip-hop artists such as Africa Bambatta influenced modern artist like Jay Z and J. Cole.

black student alliance

Attendees at “Black Music and Food in Today’s Culture” Event. Photo by Kamaria Mason.

Later in the program, the audience was honored in rap style by ODU student and rapper Covi who shared his introspection and thoughts of society through crisp lyrics and rhythmic accompaniment. The MCs then discussed the evolution of early hip-hop to 90s gangsta rap to today’s mainstream popular rap music.

The stage was again graced by ODU’s student hip-hop group Motion Madness who performed to a mashup of different songs by Chris Brown. The event concluded with a quick audience involvement activity, which tested their knowledge on hip-hop rivalries.

Students were able to leave the event with more knowledge about hip-hop’s musical and cultural influence on past and current generations. The event provided a great way to be involved as Black History Month comes to an end.